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Things to do at HAMPI

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Vijayshree resort

Things to do at HAMPI

Your stay at Vijayshree is not complete without a visit to the adjacent theme Heritage Village we have set up. Here you come up close to rural Indian life, complete with fun like camel rides, tribal dancers, astrologist, magician, puppeteers etc. To add to the thrills, we have also in store for you a try-it-to-believe-it, 32-dish traditional Rajasthani vegetarian dinner.

Hampi

There is nothing quite close to making a tryst with Hampi, the world heritage site. Dilapidated remains of an era bygone, Hampi puts you in touch with the rich past of Vijayanagara Empire. Hampi is both a historic & religious location. Must-visits include Tunga Bhadra Dam, Badami, Anegundi, Virupaksha Temple, Hampi Bazaar, Lakshmi Narasimha temple, Hemakuta Hill temples, Big Shivlinga, Vithala Temple (the famous Stone Chariot is located here), Queen's Bath, Zanana Enclosure (which also houses the Lotus Mahal), Elephant Stables, Mahanavmi Dibba, the Stepped Bath and the Matanga Hill (from where one can see the most beautiful sun set ever). Vijayshree complements this experience with equally enchanting, unforgettable hospitality. .


Vijayshree resort
Vijayshree resort

ANEGUNDI

Anegundi, older than Hampi, is situated on the northern bank of Tungabhadra River. Huchappayana matha temple (with black-stone pillars and dance sculptures), Pampa Sarovara, Aramane (a ruined palace), Ranganatha temple, Kamal Mahal, and Navabrindavan are the major attractions. Nimvapuram, a nearby village, has a mount of ash believed to be the cremated remains of monkey King Bali. Anegundi, believed to be the monkey kingdom of Kishkindha in the epic of Ramayana, is at a distance of 5 km from the historical site of Hampi. Anjanadri hill, the birth place of monkey-god Hanuman, and the mountain Rishimuka are the other places near Anegundi associated with Ramayana


TUNGABHADRA DAM

The Tungabhadra dam is constructed across the river Tungabhadra. Tourists can have a wonderful view of the waterpower of the dam, while standing at any part of the dam. Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka are the two states that share the stored water among them. To reach the dam, tourists have to take a drive through a narrow road and some surrounding hills, which are bound with coffee coloured soil and green plants. There are some small and multicolored houses beside the road. If we discount the telephone and electric lines which moves in a zigzag way, the scenery of the road is beautiful. An entry to the each end of the dam is limited due to the security reasons. The dam has 33 spillway gates to release water. A small house that serves as a lighthouse is located at the top of a mount, beside the Tungabhadra dam. This lighthouse is one of the best places to have an eye-catching view of the environment. The government of Karnataka has designed a beautiful garden at the foot of the dam, which is one of the ideal places to spend some leisure moments. On the arrival of monsoon in the months of May and June, all the gates of the dam are closed to store water in it.


Vijayshree resort
Vijayshree resort

Badami - A day Excursion

Badami was the capital of the Early Chalukyas, who ruled much of Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh between the 6th and 8th centuries. It was founded in 540 A.D. by Pulakesi I (535-566 AD), an early ruler of the Chalukyas. His sons Kirthivarman (567-598 AD) and his brother Mangalesha I (598-610 AD) constructed the cave temples. The greatest among them was Pulakeshi II (610-642 AD) who defeated many kings including Pallava king Mahendra Verman I and extended the kingdom.

The rock-cut Badami Cave Temples were sculpted mostly between the 6th and 8th centuries. The four cave temples represent the secular nature of the rulers then, with tolerance and a religious following that inclines towards Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. cave 1 is devoted to Shiva, and Caves 2 and 3 are dedicated to Vishnu, whereas cave 4 displays reliefs of Jain Tirthankaras. Deep caverns with carved images of the various incarnations of Hindu gods are strewn across the area, under boulders and in the red sandstone. From an architectural and archaeological perspective, they provide critical evidence of the early styles and stages of the southern Indian architecture.